Archives de catégorie : aménagement

Sustainable urbanization in the Gulf?

This short article was published in World Energy #42 April 2019

Eric Verdeil

Since 1987 and the release of the Bruntland Report about Sustainable Development, concerns over climate change, biodiversity and other global threats have grown. Urbanization is at the core of global anxiety. Urban population, as recorded by the UN, now reaches 4.2 billion, ie 55% of the total and is expected to grow by 2,5 billion in 2050. This tremendous growth consumes huge level of resources and emits about 75% of world Green house gases. Cities are a major factor of unsustainability, and the same time cities and urban dwellers increasingly suffer from global environmental changes. Gulf cities are no exception. Record breaking temperatures in Kuwait in 2016 highlighted the unbearable summer heats Gulf cities are facing and will have to cope with. Sea-level rise or extreme rainy events also might affect the future of cities in this region.

At the same time, governments, international organizations and urban authorities also insist that if cities are both the cause and the victims of global threats, they can also be the solution. Hence, cities have to be the place for implementing solutions, and policies have to be designed at the level of cities. The goals of these policies must be on the one side to reduce the urban environmental footprint and on the other side to address the resilience of cities. The New Urban Agenda adopted in Quito in 2016 underscored the necessity to understand sustainability as two-faceted: environmental preservation must go hand in hand with social inclusiveness.

Masdar City

How have Arab Cities and governments stepped into these directions? The continuous urban growth in this region of the world, in the face of harsh climatic conditions, has historically been made possible only through an extravagant use of cheap and widely available energy. To date, urban forms and consumption patterns are clearly at odds with sustainable practices. Until recently there were few signs of ecological concerns in this part of the world. Arab Cities are not very present in Cities networks that are at the forefront of environmental transition. For instance, the C40 Cities Climate Change Leadership Group include only three Arab Cities: Cairo, Amman and Dubai. Out of more than 1500 members, the local Governments for Sustainability Network includes only 10 from the Middle East and North Africa, five of them from Turkey. Despite this low profile in international arenas, Gulf governments loudly and glitteringly advertise their commitment to sustainable urban agendas. In the last ten years, governments have actively promoted projects and plans staging their will to implement sustainable strategies. However their motivations are complex and, in addition, achievements, also impressive, have objective limitations and should not hide contradictory trends.

Masdar City represents the first and to date, the most telling expression of urban sustainability ambitions. The famous carbon-neutral city in the suburb of Abu Dhabi, designed by Norman Foster, was launched in 2008. It uses brand new technologies in building design, energy management, renewable energy, water and waste management, as well as innovative transportation technologies. It is intended to become first a lab, and then a model for future urbanism in the region and beyond. The project became indeed a showroom, as Abu Dhabi also managed to attract the headquarters of the International Renewable Agency and to develop spectacular solar projects connected to the neighborhood. As cities in the Gulf region compete against each other in order to attract investments, governments have designed projects that emulate Abi Dhabi vision. This is for instance the case with the Saudi new towns of King Abdullah Economic Cities and above all, the latest Neom. In Dubai, several initiatives also express the will to compete with Masdar City, for instance the recent Sustainable City megaproject.

These urban projects are increasingly integrated into wider strategies aiming at developing renewable energy, as well as energy and natural resources efficiency schemes. All governments in this region have set up targets for RE production and regularly upgrade them. The UAE target 27% clean energy capacity in 2021. Saudi Arabia targets 10% RE capacity in 2023 and 30% in 2030. The continuous decrease of KWh price for solar technologies, both CSP and PV, as shown in the latest bids in Dubai and Saudi Arabia, renders these targets with reach. At the end 2018, the share of renewable energy has more than quadrupled in four years, from 210 MW in 2014 to 867 MW. But it amounts to less than 1% of electricity capacity..

Governments have also adopted ambitious schemes for energy efficiency. Green building councils have been established in almost every country in the region, which have adapted international standards for energy saving norms, such as LEED, to the local conditions, such as the Pearl rating system in Abu Dhabi. Gulf states have also begun to roll back costly subsidies to fossil fuel, electricity and water. Several cities are also building massive public transportation schemes. Dubai has been a pioneer, and now runs two metro lines. Similar projects are under construction in Riyadh, while Abu Dhabi plans its own system. But these transportation means will at least in the short term mostly serve the foreign population and not the nationals, who preferably use individual cars. Plans for electrifying the automobile system are now actively prepared but they request huge additional generation capacities, and a complete revamping of the energy distribution system.

Nevertheless, there are several differences in the narratives local authorities in this region use to justify they commitment to sustainable urbanization. In contrast to most world cities active in promoting ecological transition strategies, climate change concerns are not prominent in the governments’ discourses. The clearest element justifying the move is the necessity to prepare their economies for a post oil future. Economic diversification away from fossil energy is necessary. Clean techs and real estate stand at the core of the new green capitalism that unfolds. In this respect, sustainable urbanization appears not as a response to global threats but rather as a concern for the political stability of the countries and a new direction for economies. Abu Dhabi has taken the lead in this orientation with Masdar and other related plans. Indeed, Masdar is not only a local project but a company active in the field of renewable energy, also investing abroad and aiming at replicating its technological innovations in other contexts. Prince Mohamed Ben Salman’s Saudi 2030 plans very openly seeks to emulate his rivals’ from the Persian Gulf shore.

In the short term, fiscal pressures added up more justification for this long term goal of diversifying the economy. With the slump down of oil on international markets in 2014, most oil-based economies in the region have experienced fiscal tensions because oil revenues did not cover social expenses anymore. This affected very strongly the more populated states of Saudi Arabia or Oman where social demands are more heavily felt. Fiscal pressures played as a determinant factor in reforming electricity, fuel and water prices, which have been enforced in the last four years.

Having stated the high ambitious Gulf governments express and their original motivations, it is nevertheless necessary to underscore the limitations of those schemes. Four points come to mind:

The vulnerability of these urban sustainable projects/markets to real estate cycles remains high. The real estate crisis of 2008-09 administered a blow to Masdar City and highlighted some of the weaknesses of this kind of projects. It was downsized and reprofiled as a more classical real estate project. New developments remain well below the initially foreseen pace. The project did not fulfill its ambitious technological promises, even if the achievements already represent a strong departure from ordinary planning practices in the region. It is far from being carban-neutral even if renewable energy and energy savings allow for about 50% reduction in energy demand. Clearly, other sustainable megaprojects also depend upon foreign investments and stand at risk of similar real estate ups and downs. For instance, the delayed achievements of KAEC or Neom in Saudi Arabia illustrate their difficulty in convincing foreign investors and the fierce competition between these cities and projects, where returns are not determined only by technological advancements but also by political conditions.

This highlights the political nature of arrangements regulating access to infrastructure and resources in cities of this region and hence a certain level of uncertainties regarding the capacity of local governments to maintain the direction in the face of contradictory demands. For years, political legitimacy of the regimes in this part of the world has been linked to the provision of modern infrastructural services at cheap, in not free, price. As explained above, under fiscal pressures, governments have recently slashed subsidies for fuel, water or electricity. This effort needs to been pursued and expanded. Until now, no major protests have erupted over this issue, which however remains sensitive. Beyond that, urbanism remains car-centric and based on individual housing for nationals. This kind of urbanization, despite all improvements and the increasing capacity of renewable energy, remain unsustainable in the long run in terms of resource consumption (land, energy and water). The shortage of available land while demand remain strong creates political tensions, as already observed in Kuwait. As stated by researcher Sharifa Alshalfan, because of the “limits on development including access to land and infrastructure, supply struggled to meet the rising demand. In 2015, the Public Authority for Housing Welfare had over 106,000 applications on the waitlist for housing, yet from the start of the housing programme in 1954 and until 2015, the state was only able to provide 114,600 units. For the state to fulfil the current demand, it would need to develop almost the same amount of housing units it had provided over the past sixty years”. The sprawl of the low dense Kuwait City [MS1] connected by hundreds of kilometers of highways, creates huge traffic congestion.

Another dimension of sustainability pertains to the huge degradation of local environment around the big cities of the region. The extensive transformation of the shoreline in the Emirates as well as in Saudi Arabia has deeply devastated the local ecosystems, for instance the mangroves areas, also hurt by oil spills[S2] . The massive production of desalinated water produce as well very negative environmental outcomes. Most of the Persian Gulf desalination plants currently use thermal technology, which requires much more energy than osmose reverse technology, and also emits a lot of GHG. In any case, for every liter of fresh water, 1,5 liter of brine (and various chemical particles) is discharged into nearby water, destructing sea life because the increase of salinity (+10-15 ppm) and of higher water temperature. The introduction of the newly improved reverse osmose technology fueled by renewable solar energy, will gradually improve this dire situation, as the new Taweela unit installed by Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority exhibits.

The higher share of renewable energy, the improvement of energy intensity and of water use do not mean that the use of resources will decrease in the future. Currently, a city like Dubai emits three times more GHG per capita than New York City. On average, GCC countries exhibit levels of carbon emissions per GDP unit much higher than the world average and beyond East Asian and North American competitors. This is even stronger when considering per capita average. Future trends anticipate increase in carbon intensity, from 6,96 cubic meter of carbon per capita in 2016 for the MENA region toward 7,5 in 2030 while world average would remain below 5.

The continuous growth of population and urban surfaces in the coming years means that the ecological footprint will continue to rise, even if at a reduced pace. Stricto sensu, urban sustainability in the Gulf remains an elusive promise.


Soutenance de la thèse d’Elvan Arik : Se chauffer à Istanbul : des pratiques thermiques face aux épreuves de la transition et de l’efficacité énergétiques

Elvan ARIK soutiendra sa thèse intitulée « Se chauffer à Istanbul : des pratiques thermiques face aux épreuves de la transition et de l’efficacité énergétiques ». Cette thèse a été financée par le LabEx IMU dans le cadre du projet POUDEV (2012).

Date : 7 décembre 2018, à 14h

Lieu : amphi Est, Bâtiment des Humanités, INSA Lyon

Résumé de thèse :

Cette recherche s’intéresse aux transformations des pratiques de chauffage à Istanbul impulsées par l’arrivée d’une nouvelle ressource énergétique. À travers l’analyse d’une trajectoire heurtée et contestée de diffusion du gaz naturel en substitut de combustibles traditionnels (charbon/bois/fuel), ma thèse dévoile les spécificités et les contradictions d’un processus « ordinaire » de transition énergétique au regard des dynamiques inégales d’appropriation sociale des innovations technologiques, qui viennent conforter et parfois subvertir la nature même des projet techniques et politiques. Inspiré par des travaux sur la sociologie de l’énergie et d’écologie politique urbaine, je propose de suivre dans le temps et dans l’espace les modalités d’agencement d’un nouveau système sociotechnique (service de distribution en réseaux, équipements de chauffage prétendant à l’efficacité énergétique pour la dernière génération d’entre eux, panneaux solaires, etc.), de comprendre les logiques conflictuelles de territorialisation de ces dispositifs en lien avec d’autres dynamiques de transformations urbaines, et enfin de repérer les conditions matérielles, culturelles et socio-économiques, plus ou moins favorables, pour que ces infrastructures réussissent à s’encastrer dans le quotidien des habitants. Ce faisant, ma thèse répond à un double questionnement : comment expliquer la rapidité et la massivité du déploiement du gaz naturel étant donnée la nature des obstacles à surmonter dans le contexte d’une métropole émergente (étalement urbain, concentration de pauvreté, inadaptation d’un cadre bâti hérité à l’usage du chauffage centralisé) ? Comment interpréter les multiples formes de vulnérabilité produites par un processus de transition énergétique censé, paradoxalement, incarner la modernisation et accompagner l’internationalisation d’Istanbul ?

Spécialité : GÉOGRAPHIE – URBANISME – AMÉNAGEMENT
Mots-clés : Pratiques de chauffage, métabolismes urbains, services en réseaux, gaz naturel, vulnérabilité énergétique, transition et efficacité énergétiques, transformations urbaines, Istanbul.

Laboratoire (s) de recherche : UMR 5206 TRIANGLE
Directeur de thèse : Jean-Michel DELEUIL (Professeur, INSA de Lyon) en co-direction avec Eric VERDEIL (Professeur, Sciences Po ParisP

Composition du jury :

Sylvy JAGLIN, Professeure, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, Rapporteur

Alain NADAÏ, Directeur de recherche HDR, CIRED, Examinateur

Jean-François PÉROUSE, Maître de Conférence (HDR), Université Toulouse II, Rapporteur

Christian GHIAUS, Professeur, INSA de Lyon, Examinateur


Publication récente (1) : Energy Transition and Urban Governance in the Arab World

Masdar City

J’ai le plaisir d’annoncer la parution de cette communication lors du colloque Wise Cities in the Mediterranean organisée par la Kuwait Program de Sciences Po, dont les actes peuvent être lus en ligne ici. Voici le résumé de ma communication:

The 2015 Paris Agreement and the recent Quito New Urban Agenda both emphasised the need to empower cities in climate change policies, including energy policies that aim at energy transitions towards more energy efficiency and the use of renewable energies. Being both factors in and potential victims of climate change, cities have many reasons to act. Therefore, there is a need to examine how changes in urban governance could indeed address this necessity and the challenge cities have to face. This issue has been addressed in many studies and plans for cities in the Western and advanced industrial world. These first studies have highlighted several results. Firstly, instead of considering only climate change issues, they stressed the need to understand ecological pressures more widely, particularly the way global energy pressures, like peak oil threats or price increases have created energy stress for cities. Secondly, they also underlined how privatisation trends and the ascent of transnational energy firms reconfigured energy regulation by sidelining public energy utilities and companies. Thirdly, metropolisation, the concentration of wealth and power in the big metropolises, transforms urban governance. The role of states in energy regulation is thus undermined and metropolitan coalitions are more diverse and open to private and as well as local urban interests. Green growth becomes a new market for private firms, and metropolitan governments compete for jobs and investments in the sector. At the same time, ensuring the continuity of energy supply or of other infrastructure is another goal for metropolitan firms and authorities. This leads to new agendas, including local policies of energy transition, which combine the promotion of renewable energies and energy efficiency with the shortening of energy circuits. However, several factors that are favouring these changes in energy governance seem to be specific to world cities and might not apply in other contexts. The increasing – albeit contested – political autonomisation of such cities in their relation to national states and their specific wealth are cases in point. My goal in this chapter is to look at Arab cities, for which, at a first glance, energy transition initiatives seem difficult to identify. My chapter draws on a wide collective analysis of urban energy transition policies in ten metropolises from emerging economies, including several Arab cities such as Amman, Beirut, Tunis and Sfax (Jaglin and Verdeil, 2017; Verdeil et al., 2015; Verdeil, 2014a; 2016; forthcoming), and on secondary literature about the United Arab Emirates. It aims to propose some preliminary observations and to raise questions to fuel the upcoming debate. I will not present case studies but rather identify policy issues and policy options that vary greatly according to context and, above all, according to the national availability of fossil energy such as oil and gas and the social contracts that govern the redistribution of this wealth in exchange for loyalty.

Continuer la lecture

Concevoir l’action publique dans le Grand Beyrouth du point de vue des services

Papier présenté lors du colloque de l’Ordre des ingénieurs de Beyrouth, “Greater Urban Areas: An Important Challenge for Lebanon” 31 janvier-1er février 2018 (je rajoute dans cette version web quelques images et liens. Il est prévu que ce texte paraisse dans la revue Al Mouhandess éditée par l’Ordre des ingénieurs de Beyrouth).

L’approche des politiques urbaines au Liban est largement dominée par la question d’une amélioration des mécanismes de la planification à même de remédier à l’étalement urbain, au mitage des espaces agricoles et naturels, tout en protégeant en même temps les espaces patrimoniaux contre la densification. Plus de cinquante ans de planification urbaine depuis Michel Ecochard n’y font rien : les outils proposés semblent largement inadéquats, les propositions ambitieuses des urbanistes ne reçoivent aucun soutien politique, ou se révèlent en retard par rapport à la réalité des “coups partis”. Rester prisonnier d’une vision et d’une culture professionnelle dérivée de l’architecture, centrée prioritairement sur la régulation de l’acte de bâtir, empêche peut-être d’identifier d’autres enjeux d’action publique et d’autres leviers d’action. Dans cette communication, je propose de renverser l’analyse et de porter le regard sur les infrastructures qui sont d’ailleurs au centre des attentions et des inquiétudes des citoyens, que ce soit les déchets depuis 2015, l’électricité toujours insuffisante, l’eau manquante tous les étés (sans parler de la pollution de la mer en raison des trop rares stations d’épuration) et aussi de l’absence de transport collectif. Je défends l’idée que pour comprendre ces problèmes qui mobilisent aujourd’hui les citoyens, une autre logique d’analyse est nécessaire. Elle comporte bien entendu des nécessités techniques et relève donc de savoirs très pointus. Mais les infrastructures sont des systèmes multicouches, incorporant des valeurs socio-politiques, des outils financiers, des modes de résolution des conflits, etc. En les considérant comme des instruments au cœur de l’action publique, impliquant des arbitrages pragmatiques, et non comme des systèmes techniques apolitiques, je mets en avant des dimensions que le débat urbanistique libanais occulte ou marginalise (relations entre acteurs publics et privés, financement). Continuer la lecture

Crise des déchets et fabrique urbaine à Beyrouth

Je poursuis ma série (1, 2) sur les enjeux de la crise des déchets à Beyrouth, en archivant ici ce petit texte publié par la Lettre Cogito n°3 de Sciences Po, dans le cadre d’un dossier plus large : Les métropoles sont elles gouvernables?

La crise des déchets que connaît le Liban depuis l’été 2015 a été fortement médiatisée et a donné lieu à des analyses essentiellement intéressées par sa signification politique. Causée par la saturation de la principale décharge de l’agglomération de Beyrouth et l’incapacité des autorités gouvernementales à adopter une solution pérenne, cette crise a provoqué une forte mobilisation civique.
Au-delà de la question technique de la gestion et du traitement des ordures, les manifestants contestaient un système opaque où l’État, incapable d’assurer le fonctionnement minimal des services publics, ne sert qu’à enrichir une élite politique que seul unit le souci de « se partager le gâteau » et de se maintenir au pouvoir.

Construire sur les décharges de la guerre civile Continuer la lecture

[Archives] Lettres d’information de l’Observatoire de recherche sur Beyrouth et la reconstruction

Le Centre d’études et de recherches sur le Moyen-Orient contemporain (CERMOC) a publié entre 1995 et 2001 14 numéros de la Lettre d’information de l’Observatoire de recherche sur Beyrouth et la reconstruction, détaillant les activités de ce programme de recherche. Outre des informations par nature éphémère, cette lettre comportait des études modestes mais riches d’informations et de résultats d’enquêtes, des comptes rendus d’activités et d’ouvrages, ainsi qu’une chronologie de la reconstruction de Beyrouth qui pourrait présenter une certaine utilité à des chercheurs intéressés par cette période.
L’IFPO, qui a pris la succession du CERMOC, n’a pas jugé utile de numériser cette série malgré mes suggestions en ce sens il y a quelques années. Il se trouve que j’ai dans mes archives quelques numéros en PDF (1 à 5, 10, 13 et 14). J’ai essayé de les déposer sur HAL-SHS mais ce ne serait éventuellement acceptable qu’en distinguant article par article.
J’ai donc déposé ces numéros sur Internet Archive. Voici le lien pour les numéros 1 à 5, vers le 1013 et le 14. Ci-dessous la table des matières du n°14 (2001) que j’avais coordonné.

Parution : Circulation des matières, économies de la circularité

J’ai le plaisir de signaler la parution du dernier numéro de Flux, consacré à Circulation des matières, économies de la circularité, que j’ai coordonné avec Romain Garcier et Laurence Rocher, dans la lignée de nos travaux au sein d’ACREOR qu’ils poursuivent avec bonheur au sein de l’Atelier Matières, énergie, déchets: flux et territoires de l’UMR 5600.
Voici le résumé du texte introductif et, ci-dessous, la table des matières.

Ce texte d’introduction au dossier de Flux 2017/2 (N° 108) questionne l’émergence de la thématique de la circularité des matières dans les politiques publiques urbaines contemporaines. Les articles ont en commun de porter une attention minutieuse à la matérialité des flux qui traversent et constituent la ville et aux objets sociaux qui la composent. Ils analysent les modalités et les conséquences de leur mise en circulation, ainsi que les régulations et les conflits qui l’accompagnent. Que l’ensemble des articles traite de pratiques et de politiques ancrées dans l’espace de la région de Lyon résulte moins d’une volonté monographique que d’une rencontre en partie fortuite. Mais cela souligne en tout cas l’importance d’une approche toujours attentive aux faits géographiques et aux effets de lieu dans la diversité de leurs échelles. Trois thématiques transversales sont présentes : d’abord, en identifiant de nouvelles ressources, les articles permettent de réfléchir à l’invention et à la construction de nouveaux circuits pour les matières. Ensuite, la régulation de ces circuits implique l’identification de nouveaux acteurs et la mise en place de nouvelles formes de relations avec les producteurs et gestionnaires des matières, formant donc l’espace d’une gouvernance renouvelée. Enfin, si ces circuits se structurent dans un espace qui est celui de la proximité géographique, ils s’inscrivent néanmoins dans une logique relationnelle qui ne cesse de questionner les normes et les échelles. Ce numéro permet ainsi de nuancer et de re-matérialiser les injonctions à faire advenir l’économie circulaire dans les villes.

Table des matières

Olivier Zeller, Structurations de l’espace fécal à Lyon au XVIIIe siècle

Aurélie DumainLaurence Rocher, Des pratiques citoyennes en régime industriel : les courts-circuits du compost

Pierre Desvaux, Économie circulaire acritique et condition post-politique : analyse de la valorisation des déchets en France

Romain J. GarcierFanny Verrax, Critiques mais non recyclées : expliquer les limites au recyclage des terres rares en Europe

Laëtitia Mongeard, De la démolition à la production de graves recyclées : analyse des logiques de proximité d’une filière dans l’agglomération lyonnaise

Emerging countries, cities and energy. Questioning transitions

J’ai le plaisir de signaler la parution récente de ce chapitre : Sylvy Jaglin, Éric Verdeil. 2017, Emerging countries, cities and energy. Questioning transitions. in Stefan Bouzarovski; Martin J Pasqualetti; Vanesa Castán Broto (eds.). The Routledge Research Companion to Energy Geographies, Routledge, pp.106-120. Plus d’information en suivant ce lien.

Ci-dessous l’introduction. Pour les francophones, il s’agit d’une traduction, légèrement révisée, du texte d’introduction au dossier de la revue Flux (n°93-94, 2013) intitulé Energie et villes des pays émergents : des transitions en question (en libre accès) Continuer la lecture

Des déchets aux remblais: imaginaire aménageur, corruption et dérèglements métaboliques à Beyrouth

Le port de pêche de Borj Hammoud au pied de la “montagne” de déchets accumulés depuis la guerre civile libanaise jusqu’à 1997, avant les récents travaux de démantèlement. Photo Eric Verdeil, CC-ND-NC

Les scandales à répétition qui éclatent à propos de la gestion des déchets au Liban et plus particulièrement dans l’agglomération de Beyrouth mettent en évidence les montants énormes des contrats en question et leur opacité, et donc plus largement la corruption qui joue un rôle déterminant dans l’organisation de l’action publique. Les débats de l’été 2015 ont ainsi permis d’exposer publiquement les zones d’ombre, anomalies et irrégularités concernant les contrats successifs de Sukleen, et de pointer vers un ensemble de bénéficiaires indirects de cette rente. La réorganisation en principe provisoire de la gestion des déchets à Beyrouth et dans le Mont Liban s’est traduite par l’apparition de nouveaux acteurs, bénéficiaires des contrats de collecte ou de construction et de gestion de décharges dont les montants et les modalités techniques posent là encore question. De plus, sans même parler de la décision hautement discutable d’installer des décharges au bord du littoral, diverses anomalies ont été soulignées, comme le fait que le tri et le recyclage–déjà peu ambitieux–sont pour l’instant impossibles à cause de la saturation des installations dédiées pour cause de stockage de déchets, alors que les entreprises sont payées pour un travail qu’elles ne font pas. Enfin, le dévoilement d’une clause permettant de démanteler la décharge de Borj Hammoud pour déposer les ordures stockées là depuis les années 1990 directement dans la mer apparaît comme une provocation environnementale d’un cynisme absolu de la part du CDR–et qui va sans doute avec des contreparties financières. Continuer la lecture

La « ville-réseau » dans les villes du Sud

Dans le cadre du séminaire Circulation des références urbaines et assemblages locaux, je participerai à une séance autour la « ville-réseau » dans les villes du Sud. Elle aura lieu  le14 mars 2017. Lieu: Laboratoire PRODIG, salle de réunion du 3ème étage du centre Valette, 2 rue Valette, 75005 Paris.

Programme

– 9h 30 : introduction à la séance et tour de table

– 09h 45 : intervention de Jochen Monstadt, professeur, Chair for Governance of Urban Transitions and Dynamics, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University :
«Translating the Networked City: Emerging Infrastructures in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam »

– 11h 00 – 12h 30 : discussion

– déjeuner

– 14h – 15h 15 : intervention d’Eric Verdeil, professeur, Sciences Po, Centre de Recherches Internationales
« A quest for energy security in Middle Eastern Cities: Experiments of rebundled loops and autonomous networks »

– 15h 15 – 16h 30 : discussion