Electricity Subsidies: Benefiting some Regions More than Others – analysis featured on the LCPS website

EDL headquarters in Beirut

I am happy to announce the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies has featured my analysis about electricity subsidies in Lebanon on its website.

While the recent political showdown over where to connect the Esra Gul barge to Lebanon’s power grid is indicative of the country’s unequal electricity supply, it also unearthed something more fundamental, namely, how electricity subsidies exacerbate geographical and social inequalities. Indeed, one major problem facing Electricité Du Liban (EDL) concerns the fact that production costs exceed revenues from consumers. For many years, the difference has been covered/subsidized by the state but these subsidies impact citizens differently depending on where they reside.

More precisely, because the periphery have access to a smaller supply of electricity per day, they incur greater generator use costs than those living in the central agglomeration, particularly   municipal Beirut. Consequently, my recent study demonstrates that effective subsidies disproportionately benefit wealthier households and in particular those who live in Beirut, as the latter are supplied with more power on a daily basis compared to other regions.[1] Therefore, electricity subsidies exacerbate both geographical and social inequalities.

While the production cost of electricity—indexed to the international hydrocarbon market—has significantly increased since 1994, prices have not been reevaluated in that period. According to the National Electricity Strategy Plan of 2010, the price represented on average only 55% of the production cost per kilowatt hour. While the price structure should reflect a principle of fairness and employ progressive rates designed to ease the burden for small consumers—among whom are the country’s poorest people—a 2009 World Bank study reported the opposite. In fact, fixed costs added onto an EDL bill resulted in small consumers (who use up to 300 kilowatt hours) paying disproportionately more of their income toward energy bills than larger users. Practically, the more they consume, the more users are subsidized by the state. This is not an open and deliberate subsidy, but rather a largely unseen mechanism at work.

In fact, the study highlights geographic variances that result from the length of time that power is supplied. This adds an essential component to the distortion caused by this effective subsidy. Since 2006­-2007, Beirut has received on average nineteen to twenty-one hours of electricity per day, while other regions have received only twelve to fifteen hours if not less (depending on the time of year and in which year data was gathered). The capital’s residents use more public electricity by default and consequently benefit more from subsidies.

…/…

Read the end of the article on the LCPS website.

A French longer version, including the detailed data, is to be read on this blog.

Publication récente (2): Infrastructure crises in Beirut and the struggle to (not) reform the Lebanese State

In a recent interview for Jadaliyya, I give an overview of my newly published article in the Arab Studies Journal (#1, 2018).

Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article?

Eric Verdeil (EV): Until recently, the prolific urban research on Beirut and Lebanese cities ignored, almost entirely, issues related to networked infrastructure, a very strange fact given the magnitude of infrastructure deficiencies in the country. Only recently have scholars (like Ziad Abu-Rish or Joanne R. Nuchofor example) begun to address infrastructure related issues, particularly as they relate to electricity. Water management also remains mostly out of the scope of urban scholarship in Lebanon, which has instead concentrated on reconstruction, housing, and urban conflict. Additionally, questions regarding waste management and sanitation have also remained largely absent from the research. This article addresses these three ongoing infrastructure crises in the Greater Beirut.

The article was initially a response to the call for papers launched by Hannes Baumann and Jamil Mouawad, under the title “Wayn al-Dawla? In search of the Lebanese state.” Baumann and Mouawad’s idea was to challenge the common (and somewhat lazy) notion of a weak state in Lebanon. They highlighted the inputs of mid-range theories that show how state institutions are part of a wider landscape of powers that interact with the state, often displaying “hybrid sovereignties.” Baumann and Mouawad personally chose to analyze the Central Bank and the Lebanese Army in the light of Marxist and Foucaldian approaches, thus showing how the state is at times able to reconfigure local capitalism, or to produce a “state effect,” for instance, in Akkar. They suggested that I write about electricity and the state in Lebanon, specifically about the fact that electricity has become the paradoxical symbol of the existence/absence of the state: “ejit al dawleh,” say the people when the electricity comes back after a power cut. Due to lengthy revisions on both sides, the article eventually appeared one year after the theme issue was released.

For me, it was also an opportunity to translate and adapt the results of a research project I had undertaken about the governance of urban infrastructure in Beirut in the framework of a project led by sociologist Dominique Lorrain on Mediterranean Metropolises. The general objective of this research was to take seriously the materiality of the city, including infrastructure, and to test the hypothesis that even when political institutions fail to govern the city, as seen when violent conflicts erupt, infrastructure provides some minimal level of consensus and agreement that allows for urban life to go on. At first glance, this hypothesis was far from obvious in the case of Beirut, but it provided an interesting chance to understand where the Lebanese state is when infrastructure fails.

Read the end of the interview on Jadaliyya.

The article will be in Open Access from the HAL-SHS repository starting November 2018.

Publication récente (1) : Energy Transition and Urban Governance in the Arab World

Masdar City

J’ai le plaisir d’annoncer la parution de cette communication lors du colloque Wise Cities in the Mediterranean organisée par la Kuwait Program de Sciences Po, dont les actes peuvent être lus en ligne ici. Voici le résumé de ma communication:

The 2015 Paris Agreement and the recent Quito New Urban Agenda both emphasised the need to empower cities in climate change policies, including energy policies that aim at energy transitions towards more energy efficiency and the use of renewable energies. Being both factors in and potential victims of climate change, cities have many reasons to act. Therefore, there is a need to examine how changes in urban governance could indeed address this necessity and the challenge cities have to face. This issue has been addressed in many studies and plans for cities in the Western and advanced industrial world. These first studies have highlighted several results. Firstly, instead of considering only climate change issues, they stressed the need to understand ecological pressures more widely, particularly the way global energy pressures, like peak oil threats or price increases have created energy stress for cities. Secondly, they also underlined how privatisation trends and the ascent of transnational energy firms reconfigured energy regulation by sidelining public energy utilities and companies. Thirdly, metropolisation, the concentration of wealth and power in the big metropolises, transforms urban governance. The role of states in energy regulation is thus undermined and metropolitan coalitions are more diverse and open to private and as well as local urban interests. Green growth becomes a new market for private firms, and metropolitan governments compete for jobs and investments in the sector. At the same time, ensuring the continuity of energy supply or of other infrastructure is another goal for metropolitan firms and authorities. This leads to new agendas, including local policies of energy transition, which combine the promotion of renewable energies and energy efficiency with the shortening of energy circuits. However, several factors that are favouring these changes in energy governance seem to be specific to world cities and might not apply in other contexts. The increasing – albeit contested – political autonomisation of such cities in their relation to national states and their specific wealth are cases in point. My goal in this chapter is to look at Arab cities, for which, at a first glance, energy transition initiatives seem difficult to identify. My chapter draws on a wide collective analysis of urban energy transition policies in ten metropolises from emerging economies, including several Arab cities such as Amman, Beirut, Tunis and Sfax (Jaglin and Verdeil, 2017; Verdeil et al., 2015; Verdeil, 2014a; 2016; forthcoming), and on secondary literature about the United Arab Emirates. It aims to propose some preliminary observations and to raise questions to fuel the upcoming debate. I will not present case studies but rather identify policy issues and policy options that vary greatly according to context and, above all, according to the national availability of fossil energy such as oil and gas and the social contracts that govern the redistribution of this wealth in exchange for loyalty.

Continuer la lecture

Subventions électriques invisibles: le privilège beyrouthin

Le Liban se classe parmi les pires pays du monde en termes de fourniture électrique [1]. L’insuffisance de la production électrique se traduit par un rationnement qui atteint plus de 12 h /j dans une large partie du pays. Cette situation date de la guerre civile. Après une période d’amélioration grâce aux investissements dans de nouvelles centrales électriques et dans le réseau des années 1990, la situation s’est de nouveau dégradée à partir de 2006. Malgré le plan du ministre Gebran Bassil en 2010, peu d’améliorations ont été apportées, les investissements réalisés et les nouvelles capacités mises en ligne (en 2017) ne compensant pas l’augmentation de la demande, qui n’est satisfaite que grâce au développement de la génération privée.

Les dysfonctionnements du secteur électrique libanais pèsent lourdement sur les ménages et les agents économiques. De plus, l’électricité est la première source du déficit public libanais. Elle représentait en 2013 40% de la dette publique cumulée et 55% du déficit budgétaire. Le déficit s’explique par diverses raisons. La mauvaise gestion technique et commerciale de l’entreprise est une première explication des pertes: les pertes techniques se montent à environ 15%, les pertes non techniques atteignant elles 25%. 40% de l’énergie produite n’est donc pas payée. Toutefois, il faut aussi mentionner la structure du tarif de l’électricité qui ne reflète pas ses couts de revient. En effet, le tarif moyen par KWh est de 141 LL en 2007, alors que le cout de production est estimé à 255 LL/KWh en 2009. Autrement dit, en moyenne, l’abonné ne paye que 55% du cout de revient. Ce désajustement du tarif par rapport aux couts explique donc aussi une partie importante du déficit de l’entreprise.

Les discussions publiques se focalisent, ces dernières années, sur la construction de nouvelles capacités de production pour mettre fin au rationnement, et sur les modalités de financement de ces investissements : faut-il investir de l’argent public, et où le trouver? ou mettre à contribution le secteur privé, mais alors à quelles conditions? Dans la période précédente, la problématique du vol et de la fraude était aussi fortement mise en avant[2]. Ces débats laissent largement de côté la question de la tarification. Le gouvernement considère que le réajustement ne pourrait intervenir qu’une fois l’amélioration du système bien amorcée, rendant une hausse de tarif plus acceptable. En attendant, le désajustement du tarif constitue une subvention de facto, dont les effets ont rarement été examiné.

Comme dans de nombreux pays en développement, la tarification d’EDL est en marches d’escalier, chaque palier (ou bloc) de consommation étant facturé à un certain prix, dans un objectif d’équité sociale. Toutefois, seule la tranche au-delà de 500 kWH est facturée à un prix supérieur au prix de revient, alors qu’elle ne représente qu’une petite fraction de la consommation[3]. A cette tarification variable s’ajoute une partie fixe et des taxes. Les études de la Banque Mondiale (2009) ont mis en évidence qu’en réalité, cette tarification n’était pas progressive car le poids des charges fixes pèse très lourdement sur les ménages qui consomment peu.

Dans cette note, j’examine une autre distorsion, spatiale, liée à cette tarification. Le Liban se caractérise en effet par des inégalités géographiques dans les dotations en courant. Beyrouth, la capitale, reçoit une dotation en courant nettement plus longue que les autres régions. En moyenne, elle ne subit que 3 à 4 h de coupures, les autres régions recevant moins de 15h, parfois moins. Cette distorsion n’est pas seulement de nature géographique mais aussi sociale : en effet les résidents de Beyrouth sont en moyenne d’un niveau socio-économique plus élevé. Plus riches, plus équipés, mieux dotés en électricité, ils consomment davantage. Or, étant donné la structure des tarifs, plus ils consomment, plus ils coûtent à l’EDL. Le raisonnement est connu et parfois mentionné. En revanche, à ma connaissance il n’a jamais été estimé précisément. Je propose ici d’essayer de caractériser cette distorsion. Continuer la lecture

Concevoir l’action publique dans le Grand Beyrouth du point de vue des services

Papier présenté lors du colloque de l’Ordre des ingénieurs de Beyrouth, “Greater Urban Areas: An Important Challenge for Lebanon” 31 janvier-1er février 2018 (je rajoute dans cette version web quelques images et liens. Il est prévu que ce texte paraisse dans la revue Al Mouhandess éditée par l’Ordre des ingénieurs de Beyrouth).

L’approche des politiques urbaines au Liban est largement dominée par la question d’une amélioration des mécanismes de la planification à même de remédier à l’étalement urbain, au mitage des espaces agricoles et naturels, tout en protégeant en même temps les espaces patrimoniaux contre la densification. Plus de cinquante ans de planification urbaine depuis Michel Ecochard n’y font rien : les outils proposés semblent largement inadéquats, les propositions ambitieuses des urbanistes ne reçoivent aucun soutien politique, ou se révèlent en retard par rapport à la réalité des « coups partis ». Rester prisonnier d’une vision et d’une culture professionnelle dérivée de l’architecture, centrée prioritairement sur la régulation de l’acte de bâtir, empêche peut-être d’identifier d’autres enjeux d’action publique et d’autres leviers d’action. Dans cette communication, je propose de renverser l’analyse et de porter le regard sur les infrastructures qui sont d’ailleurs au centre des attentions et des inquiétudes des citoyens, que ce soit les déchets depuis 2015, l’électricité toujours insuffisante, l’eau manquante tous les étés (sans parler de la pollution de la mer en raison des trop rares stations d’épuration) et aussi de l’absence de transport collectif. Je défends l’idée que pour comprendre ces problèmes qui mobilisent aujourd’hui les citoyens, une autre logique d’analyse est nécessaire. Elle comporte bien entendu des nécessités techniques et relève donc de savoirs très pointus. Mais les infrastructures sont des systèmes multicouches, incorporant des valeurs socio-politiques, des outils financiers, des modes de résolution des conflits, etc. En les considérant comme des instruments au cœur de l’action publique, impliquant des arbitrages pragmatiques, et non comme des systèmes techniques apolitiques, je mets en avant des dimensions que le débat urbanistique libanais occulte ou marginalise (relations entre acteurs publics et privés, financement). Continuer la lecture

Toward a connected history of planning in Arab cities

During my next visit to Kuwait, I will be presenting the chapter « Planning histories in tha Arab World » Joe Nasr and I wrote in the Routledge Handbook Planning History at CEFAS on the 22nd of April.

Over the past century and a half, most accounts of cities of the Arab world have viewed them
through the lens of an organically built urban fabric, understood as an Islamic heritage, an
expression of a collective and religious ethos. Planning, as a professionally conceived endeavor
aiming at structuring changes in cities, was perceived as almost nonexistent in this world region.
However, recent scholarship (primarily in French and English), based on case-studies dealing
mostly with the principal cities in the region, has shown that extensive planning over many
decades has marked cities across the Arab world, from cutting arteries through existing built
fabric to laying out infrastructure and neighborhoods at the urban edge. This scholarship has
identified some unifying trends, including the model of spectacular urbanism that emerged from the Gulf region thanks to the circuits of oil money and the rise of a new political order, spreading to the rest of the region and beyond (Elsheshtawy 2008). Drawing on this historiography, this talk proposes five threads that posit planning as a central, but contested, practice in the making of Arab cities: 1) Planning, state building, and elite affirmation. 2) Tension between modernization and preservation. 3) A connected and networked history. 4) Planning cultures and roles of “planners.” 5) Planning and ordinary citizens.

This conference draws from the recent chapter co-written with Joe Nasr: Éric Verdeil, Joe Nasr.
« Planning Histories in the Arab World« , in Carola Hein (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Planning
History, Routledge, pp.271-285, 2017. (Do not hesitate to ask for a PDF of the text)

 

Jbeil. Toward an Inclusive City

I am pleased to release the Capstone report the team of students from the Urban School at Sciences Po (Marina Najjar, Corentin Ortais, Diane Pialucha, Lucien Zerbib) I supervised last semester (February-June 2017) elaborated for the Municipality of Jbeil, Lebanon. Capstones are « client-oriented group research projects, based on original field research which generates a deliverable product ».

Below is the executive summary of the report, which can be downloaded from here.

Executive summary

Jbeil is a unique city with a rich and profound historical legacy. Its cultural heritage, its old port, peaceful environment and growing economy, all make it an attractive city for people from all over Lebanon and the world. Yet, certain challenges
accompany its development as it transforms into an attractive economic pole in the
region. This report argues that inclusive measures which place the residents of Jbeil at the center of its vision can answer current challenges and ensure a resilient development for city. In the following report, we propose four main strategies in order to reach an inclusive vision.

Firstly, in order to stimulate the economy, this report recommends a diversification of the economic system by:

  • Promoting a sustainable tourism which broadens the offer of tourist attractions
    ▶Exemplary reference: Eco-tourism in Sidi Amor, Tunisia
  • Investing in different economic potential to foster a balanced economy
    Exemplary reference: Creativity platform in Thessaloniki, Greece. Improvement of the urban environment

Secondly, to improve mobility, especially between the East and the West of the city, and enhance green and accessible urban spaces, this report recommends:

  • Promoting alternative modes of transportation and improve mobility
    ▶Exemplary reference: Demand Responsive Transport in Hericourt, France
  • Drawing on open spaces to promote well-being and spaces where families can socialize
    ▶Exemplary reference: The Bothy Project World Garden in Glasgow, United Kingdom

Thirdly, to enhance social involvement in order to include residents in the city’s activities and urban decisions, strategies include:

  • Implicating residents in the decision making process of governance of Jbeil
    ▶Exemplary reference: Local democracy in Nîmes, France
  • Improve cohesion and peace by promoting events and projects that activate social engagement, from the youth to the elderly
    ▶Exemplary reference: Neighbors day in Cannes, France

Finally, the development of a coordinated governance is necessary to successfully implement policies and projects. This can be done by:

  • Adapting the organisation of the Municipality to a rapidly growing city through coordination
  • Envisioning a comprehensive city strategy
    ▶Exemplary reference: Open Street Mapping in Chefchaouen, Morroco

Lancement du programme de recherche Hybridelec

Beyrouth, Achrafieh : ensemble de générateurs formant une véritable petite centrale électrique au cœur d’un quartier résidentiel de la capitale (mai 2017)

J’ai le plaisir d’annoncer le lancement d’Hybridelec, que je dirige avec l’appui de Sylvy Jaglin. Il s’agit d’une nouvelle recherche? financée par l’ANR (Défi 2 consacré à l’énergie). Elle est consacrée à l’hybridation des systèmes électriques dans les villes des pays en développement et émergents. Celles-ci connaissent de lourds problèmes de fourniture en électricité que les réponses conventionnelles telles que l’extension du réseau ne parviennent pas à résoudre. C’est pourquoi on assiste au développement de solutions alternatives, individuelles ou collectives, tels que des réseaux décentralisés et hybrides. Appliquant le concept d’hybridation aux études socio-techniques, la recherche propose d’étudier ces nouvelles configurations, qui restent mal connues, et leurs impacts sur le futur du système électrique. D’une durée de 4 ans, la recherche étudiera empiriquement ces systèmes (par enquête auprès des acteurs du marché et analyse des pratiques de régulation) et examinera leur impact sur les conceptions usuelles de la transition énergétique.

L’équipe regroupe des chercheurs du CERI-Sciences Po, du LATTS-Université de Marne-la-Vallée et de PRODIG-Université Paris I/CNRS/IRD. Les terrains seront situés en Afrique subsahariene (Mali, Nigérias, Tchad, Burkina-Faso, Tanzanie, Afrique du Sud, et peut d’autres), en Asie du Sud (Inde et Pakistan) et au Moyen Orient (Liban). Nous avons prévu de recruter prochainement un postdoc pour travailler en Inde et un doctorant pour travailler au Liban.

Un carnet accompagnera le développement de cette recherche, que je vous invite à consulter dès maintenant.

Pour les lecteurs de ce blog, précisons que cette recherche prolonge les recherches entreprises au Liban depuis plusieurs années sur la gestion de la pénurie électrique grâce notamment aux générateurs (voir en particulier ces références: Verdeil 2009, Gabillet 2010, Verdeil 2016). Elle s’inscrit par ailleurs dans le prolongement d’une collective précédente, coordonnée par Sylvy Jaglin, TERMOS (Trajectoires énergétiques des métropoles du Sud) dont des résultats détaillés ont été publiés dans la revue Flux en 2013 (voir l’introduction du dossier et une version en anglais).

PhD Position on Eastern Mediterranean oil and gas discoveries, regional geopolitics and economic development issues (part of the SALGIANT project)

Update: this call has been extended until the 21th september 2018. Look at the new call on this link or here.

I am pleased to announce the launch of the SALGIANT network and more specifically the research task Eastern Mediterranean oil and gas discoveries, regional geopolitics and economic development issues, which involves the recruitment of a young research for a PhD related to this issue, under my supervision.

SALTGIANT is a rare cross-disciplinary network of natural and social scientists dedicated to understanding the formation of the Mediterranean Salt Giant, one of the largest salt deposits on Earth, and its implications for sub-seafloor microbial life, risk assessment in the oil industry, geo-economics of the Mediterranean region and the history of oceanography.

source: https://medsalt.eu/the-project/ (Credit: Lofi et al. Seismic atlas 2, in prep.)

source: https://medsalt.eu/the-project/ (Credit: Lofi et al. Seismic atlas 2, in prep.)

Continuer la lecture

Planning histories in the Arab World

J’ai le grand plaisir d’annoncer la parution du chapitre que j’ai écrit avec Joe Nasr pour la Routledge  Handbook of Planning History, sous la direction de Carola Hein. C’est un très bel effort collectif, qui propose une vision élargie et critique de l’histoire de l’urbanisme. Une vision vraiment mondiale intégrant en particulier les espaces colonisés et les pratiques spécifiques d’urbanisation qui ont façonnés leurs villes. Une vision critique au sens où elle s’ouvre à des thématiques nouvelles (environnement, community planning, etc.) et prend en compte les échecs et les subversions, non pas seulement les actions des grands hommes et leurs grands gestes mais aussi le vécu quotidien et les finalités politiques souvent cachées des politiques urbaines.

Notre chapitre « Planning Histories in the Arab World » propose une vision synthétique et je pense assez inédite des tentatives et des réalisations urbanistiques sur plus d’un siècle d’histoire. Je serai heureux de fournir le texte aux personnes qui m’en feront la demande (les épreuves ont subi de nombreuses retouches et je n’ai pas de version auteur à jour à mettre en ligne) et en attendant, voici le résumé. Le volume est assez onéreux mais il sera vraiment utile dans de nombreuses bibliothèques. Continuer la lecture